Slash has suggested that Guns N’ Roses will have an especially busy year in 2025.

The individual members of the legendary rock band have largely been concentrating on their own projects. Last month, Slash released his blues covers album ‘Orgy Of The Damned’ while earlier this month, Duff McKagan announced a US solo tour.

Slash was asked about his future plans in an interview for Loudwire Nights, where he revealed the wheels would soon be in motion for Guns N’ Roses.

“I’m going into the studio with the Conspirators [his project with Myles Kennedy], getting a new record done and then after that, 2025 is all about Guns N’ Roses,” he said.

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“We’re trying to get some things going with that. I think there’s a small tour in the summertime next year. I heard a rumor about that anyway, so that’s going to be focused on that. But prior to that, it’s the S.E.R.P.E.N.T. tour, and then the Conspirators.”

He added that he is constantly trying to stay busy. “It keeps me out of trouble, as they say.”

Axl Rose and Slash of Guns N’ Roses perform on the Pyramid Stage on Day 4 of Glastonbury Festival 2023. Credit: Leon Neal/Getty Images

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Last month, Slash said that Guns N’ Roses were “trying” to make a new album. They have not released a full-length record since 2008’s much-delayed ‘Chinese Democracy’, on which Slash did not appear. Since he rejoined in 2016, they have released a handful of new tracks, including ‘Absurd’, ‘Hard Skool’, ‘Precious’ and ‘The General’, but there has been no confirmation of a further album.

“Guns N’ Roses are trying to make their own record,” he said, when asked by the Daily Star (via Music News) why he didn’t invite Axl Rose onto his own solo album. “And I’m working with them in that capacity, but this [solo album] didn’t involve anyone else.”

“It was my own side thing, so I wasn’t dragging my own guys in.”

Guns N’ Roses  were last in the UK a year ago when they headlined Glastonbury. In a three-star review of their set, NME wrote: “Guns N’ Roses’ sultry, whiskey-chugging, in-your-face brand of rock felt misplaced when delivered at the hippie nucleus of the world.

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For the most part, the majority of the setlist goes unrecognised by the audience, and momentum only really gathers for a handful of songs in their 24-song set. The quiet moments between the band kicking off another song — instead of being greeted by endless applause like seen at their headline shows — become awkward silences, as the crowd waits for them to hurry up and bring out another one of their most famous tracks. Even Roses’ tongue-in-cheek joke of introducing ‘ABSURD’ as a track that “tugs at the heartstrings” fell on deaf ears.

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