A new report has claimed that 35 independent nightlife businesses are lost each week.

According to results collected by CGA by NielsonIQ, and shared by the Night Time Industries Association (NTIA), there has been a “sharp decrease” in the number of nightlife businesses operating.

Since September 2022, there has been a five per cent decline in businesses that are open. These businesses, which include clubs, bars, and music venues, are now vanishing at a rate of more than 30 a week. A total of 1,825 businesses have been lost in the last 12 months.

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It follows the news that 30 per cent of nightclubs have shut their doors permanently since 2020, with the Midlands and the North seeing the most losses.

Courteeners at Club NME. Credit: Phoebe Fox

Michael Kill, CEO of the NTIA, issued a statement saying: “These figures are not just numbers; they represent the livelihoods, dreams, and cultural heritage of our communities. The night time economy, which includes a thriving ecosystem of independent businesses, has been disproportionately affected by the pandemic and cost inflation. The decline in independent businesses is a stark indicator of the immense challenges faced by those who contribute to the vibrancy and soul of our nighttime culture.”

He further called upon the government to evaluate the upcoming autumn budget and “provide proportionate support that will safeguard the future of these independent businesses. The night time economy is an essential part of our national identity, and it is at risk of fading into the shadows without immediate intervention.

“To secure the survival of these vital businesses, we urge the government to extend the current business rates relief and reduce the VAT to 12.5 per cent. These measures are the financial lifelines that independent businesses and the night time economy desperately need to weather this storm.”

Earlier this year, the NTIA also claimed that the UK government was “intentionally” closing down nightclubs and venues across the country: “Nightclubs and venues across the UK have been one of the hardest hit by crises,” said the NTIA. “These businesses contribute billions in tax to HMRC and local authorities in taxation, but have seen very little support from the Government in return. Every one of these businesses has an important part in the recovery of the local economy and has a great importance within communities beyond the dance floor.”

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